The Greenhouse Blog

Capturing Something Else: André Dao on Jogjakarta

(André Dao is one of the writers travelling across Java as part of Island to Island, a new immersive cultural exchange program supported by Asialink Arts and Arts Victoria)  

 

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Stepping through a small metal gate off a quiet side street in Jogjakarta, we find ourselves in a shaded garden facing an old building whose sign reads:

KUNCI

Copy Station

Since 1999

On the front porch is a boxed-up arcade machine, plastered with FRAGILE stickers, and inside we find books shelved and stacked on racks and ancient TV sets. On one wall is a mockup of Jokowi-JK in the Month of Ramadan, a Tintin parody featuring Indonesia’s President-elect and his running mate. Jokowi is widely seen as Indonesia’s best hope for a clean political break; the comic is subtitled Jokowimania.

Nuraini Juliastuti, one of the founders of KUNCI, arrives on a motorbike as we browse the library. Nuraini tells us she co-founded the ‘Cultural Studies Centre’ fifteen years ago, as a way to discuss the things that Indonesia’s existing cultural institutions were passing over. Those cultural institutions were – and are – preoccupied with big politics and the state of the nation. In contrast, as Nuraini explains, KUNCI’s founders wanted to “capture something else”, which meant exploring previously ignored subjects like fashion, youth culture and LGBTI issues.

Nuraini Juliastuti, co-founder of KUNCI

Nuraini Juliastuti, co-founder of KUNCI

 

Over the years, that “something else” has continued to expand. KUNCI Cultural Studies Centre now functions as a co-working space, library, research centre and discussion area. It also publishes a quarterly journal, which started life in print before migrating online (print distribution – on a store-by-store basis – was simply too much work, says Nuraini).

A quick look at the library reveals shelves devoted to a broad range of topics, from Feminism and Gender to Architecture and Ethnography, with Western and Eastern thinkers lined up side-by-side. If the arrangement of the books seems a little chaotic, it is very much deliberate. In a recent workshop at KUNCI run by Sydney artist Rebecca Conroy (just one example of the many Australian collaborations that happen here, including one this year between the Footscray Community Arts Centre and KUNCI), the idea of “radical archiving” was discussed. The idea, Nuraini explains, is to deconstruct the Dewey decimal system in order to rethink how we organise our knowledge products.

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With this comes a restructuring of the relationship between the library’s owner and its users. In the traditional library, we are told how and where to find information. That system is both patriarchal and rather abstract, says Nuraini. The shelves at most libraries are not designed to be browsed; instead, we are herded to the catalogue computers. In contrast, KUNCI asks those who come in to try to re-imagine the best ways to organise information. It’s an approach that accords with KUNCI’s ethos of creative experimentation, and its focus on the intersections between theory and practice. Membership of KUNCI is open and voluntary, and radical archiving is only the latest in a long line of efforts to create an open and culturally critical Indonesia.

The growth of KUNCI – as with most artistic endeavours in Jogja – has been quite organic. Indeed, the library began with Nuraini and her co-founder’s personal book collections. A willingness to create new spaces and start new initiatives seems to be characteristic of the artists in this city, and Nuraini is quick to point out that KUNCI is not affiliated with any official educational institution, giving it a rare amount of independence and flexibility compared to other academic research centres.

André Dao and Nuraini Juliastuti

André Dao and Nuraini Juliastuti

 

The night before our trip to KUNCI, as we sat down to dinner after a long train trip from Jakarta to Jogjakarta, a group of young buskers arrived outside the restaurant. They played songs typical of Jogja – rousing sing-a-longs, accompanied by acoustic guitars, drums and a double bass, featuring choruses like, “The people’s representatives should be able to live with the people”. The songs are all composed by local Jogja musicians, and the most popular ones are taken up by other musicians.

It’s all part of the Jogja ethos – to create first and worry about paying the bills later. Politically, Jogjakarta is accorded special status as a “Special Region” within the Indonesian republic because of its prompt support for independence in 1945. But that doesn’t tell the whole story. As the chorus to another buskers’ favourite goes, “Jogjakarta is special because the people are special.”

 

 

 

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Island to Island is presented by Asialink Arts and the Emerging Writers’ Festival, supported by Arts Victoria.

Back in the Big Durian: Gillian Terzis on Jakarta

(Gillian Terzis is one of the writers travelling across Java as part of Island to Island, a new immersive cultural exchange program supported by Asialink Arts and Arts Victoria)

 

Being back in Jakarta felt like a kind of homecoming: I first found a taste for reporting and feature writing four years ago as an intern at The Jakarta Post, one of the city’s English-language newspapers.

Since then, some things have changed – and some haven’t. Indonesia has a new president in Joko Widodo, a former furniture salesman and Metallica fan with no known links to corporations or political figures, who is said to represent a symbolic break from the centralised cronyism and corruption of the Suharto era. But vestiges of the authoritarian old elite remain. The political party of Prabowo Subianto, the defeated presidential candidate and Suharto henchman, continues to be a redoubtable force. His party played a major role in rescinding one of the country’s key democratic reforms, which resulted in the abolition of municipal elections last week.

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The Island to Island team in Jakarta

Upon arriving I forgot how overwhelming Jakarta can be, with its air thick with exhaust fumes and its traffic snaked for kilometres down major thoroughfares. Its nickname, the “Big Durian”, seems especially apt. Much like its prickly and smelly namesake, the city elicits strong reactions: you either love it or you don’t. It’s not particularly pedestrian-friendly, yet travelling by car is also a major hassle. Public transport is an unreliable option. It’s a city both on the cusp of significant economic and cultural changes but beset by challenges of geography, infrastructure and bureaucratic buck-passing.

Yet the city still manages to function even when, by all logic, it shouldn’t.  For some, this is part of its charm. Jakarta’s worsening gridlock tends to dispel the notion of peak hours, and Friday at 2pm was no exception. We had arranged to meet Ninda Daianti and Maggie Tiojakin (our Island to Island travelling companions) in Kemang. It was a 10-km trip from our hotel on Jalan Thamrin that took us nearly 1.5 hours.

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Maggie Tiojakin in conversation with the other Island to Island writers

Maggie and Ninda are both exciting emerging Jakartan writers with a few novels and short story collections under each of their belts. Over beers and burgers, we compared the nature of our respective literary communities: Jakarta’s is disparate, while Melbourne’s is fairly small, and rarely extends beyond a four-kilometre radius. Geography may well explain the lack of a literary community in Jakarta: they said Jakartan writers tended to be scattered all over the place.

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We also swapped publishing-world war stories. At an Indonesia publishing house like Gramedia, for instance, one editor can be expected to have overseen up to 150 books. Inspirational and self-help books tend to be bestsellers in Indonesia, while sports biographies tend to rake in the dollars back home. Publishing in both countries is a numbers game, which makes finding shelf space for literary fiction and non-fiction a daunting task.

At Salihara Komunitas, supporting these kinds of artistic endeavours is especially vital.  Unlike in Melbourne, where support for emerging artists is robust, the scene in Jakarta seems more nascent.  Founded by playwright and publisher Goenawan Mohamad om 2008, Salihara is Jakarta’s first multidisciplinary arts centre, comprising a theatre, gallery, bookshop and an artists’ residency for dancers, musicians, painters and writers. It has a special focus on promoting new and innovative artworks. It holds more than 100 arts events throughout the year, which include performances, public lectures, literary readings and workshops, as well as its flagship literary biennale. The centre also teaches classes for aspiring writers of all ages (some as young as 15), with a small proportion of students going on to publish books of their own through the centre’s publishing arm, Tempo.

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‘Surat ke Langit (A Letter to the Sky)’ at Salihara

Zen Hae, the centre’s publishing manager and editor-in-chief of Indonesian literary journal Kalam, said that Salihara is one of two organisations in Jakarta that provide Indonesian and foreign artists with opportunities to exchange ideas, connect with other emerging and established writers, engage in debate and form a community. Much of Salihara’s funding comes from private donors, which means it is less reliant on the diminished largesse of government organisations like the Jakarta Arts Council. While the Jakarta Writers’ Festival has ceased due to a lack of state funding, other festivals have sprung up in Ubud and Makassar. This year Jakarta also hosted the inaugural ASEAN Literary Festival, which showcased the works of writers from all over South-East Asia.

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‘Surat ke Langit (A Letter to the Sky)’ at Salihara

On our visit to Salihara we saw a contemporary puppet show as part of the centre’s three-week Happy Go Artsy festival, which featured artists from Indonesia, Australia, the Czech Republic, Germany, France, The Netherlands and Georgia.  I went in expecting an updated version of wayang (shadow puppetry), but it turned out to be unlike anything I’d ever seen: giant papier-mached bobble heads, which would sometimes be disembodied during the performance, were wheeled onto the stage on trundles. The set design was exquisite: paper boats, containing letters from the living to the deceased, were suspended from the ceiling. The performance itself was a rollercoaster of exaggerated emotion, broad comedy, moments of pathos and genuine tragedy: the show’s co-creator, we were told afterwards, had died during its production. It was an experience both bewildering and fascinating, and it seemed a fitting way to cap off our time in Jakarta.

 

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Island to Island is presented by Asialink Arts and the Emerging Writers’ Festival, supported by Arts Victoria.

Off to Indonesia: EWF Goes Island-hopping!

Tonight the Emerging Writers’ Festival is off to Jakarta, joined by two exceptional emerging Australian writers – André Dao and Gillian Terzis – and two exciting emerging Indonesian writers – Maggie Tiojakin and Ninda Daianti.

For five days (Sept 26 – Sept 30), the writers will travel across Java as part of Island to Island, a new immersive cultural exchange program supported by Asialink Arts and Arts Victoria, before ending up in Bali in time for the 2014 Ubud Writers & Readers Festival (October 1 – 5).

Follow the writers on their journey by following the blog, and @emergingwriters on Twitter and Instagram. Chat with the writers about their experiences using the #islandtoisland hashtag.

Once the EWF reaches Ubud, we’ll be helping run a series of exciting events. If you’re in Ubud, join us for some engaging and challenging discussions about activism, graphic novels, the ethics of online translation, and more!

EWF @ Ubud Writers and Readers Festival 2014

1 October

8 – 10pm: Pecha Kucha

Pecha Kucha means fast furious fun, as brave Festival artists step onto the stage to share things they love in the 20×20 format: 20 images, each for 20 seconds. This worldwide phenomenon again comes to Ubud; be warned to uncover the unexpected. Co-presented by Hubud.

2 October

2.15 – 3.15pm: Island to Island Wrapup

Two emerging writers from Australia. Two emerging writers from Indonesia. An overland journey from Jakarta to Bali. Listen to lessons learnt and stories earnt from a cross-country trek this foursome will never forget. Island to Island is presented by Asialink Arts and the Emerging Writers’ Festival, supported by Arts Victoria.

3 October

11.45 – 1pm: #activism

In our hyper-connected world we can all do our bit to support different causes. But does that petition you sign and share actually make a difference? Hear from these #activists as to what works for them and what they’re fighting for.

4 October

2.15 – 3.15pm: Fringe to Centre: Regional and minority writers online

How is the internet helping regional and minority writers build communities and support networks? How do we air more diverse voices? Elliott Bledsoe and Andre Dao discuss the challenges and rewards of writing in and from the regions, and consider how we can create digital solutions to bring fringe voices to the centre.

3.30 – 4.30pm: Binary Code: Gender, Words, & Digital Spaces

We often speak about digital spaces as though they’re radically egalitarian, but are some parts of the web more egalitarian than others? When it comes to online journalism, blogging, or cranking out code, who is underrepresented and why? 

4 – 5pm: Dharma Punks, Buddhist Monks & Johnny Cash

We dip into the inkwells of New Zealand, Japan, Indonesia and Germany to meet the monsters, punks, monks, boxers and crooners who make up the marvellous world of graphic novels.

4.45 – 5.45pm: Start Me Up: the Art & Craft of Digital Media Businesses

What opportunities exist for sustainable digital media businesses? How can writers and editors better collaborate with designers, developers, and marketing professionals to bring their ideas to fruition? In this practical session, Guy Vincent speaks about establishing book pre-order platform Publishizer, and Julie Renouf explores how authors can push the limits of what electronic books can do.

5 October

2.15 – 3.15pm: Crowdsourcing Translation: Bridges Across the Multilingual Web

The web is linguistically diverse, yet often English-speakers mistake their provincial Anglosphere for the world. In this session, Indonesia-based author and translator Maggie Tiojakin and Melbourne-based writer Andre Dao reflect on multilingual crowds, digital bridges across cultures, and options for global readership.

3.30 – 4.30pm: Bait & Switch: the New Economics of Publishing Online

In an age where reader engagement is measured in clicks and where it’s expected every piece should go explosively viral, how do writers adapt to the digital environment without losing their souls? What’s the difference between ‘clickbait’ and ‘clickability’? How do writers craft web articles that are shareable but still substantial? 

4.45 – 5.45pm: Step Away From the Screen: Offline Writing About the Web

Should we use Twitter to write about Twitter? Is the best way to deconstruct Facebook through a status update? If clarity emerges with distance, maybe we need to step away from our screens to write about them. Join Nic Low and Gillian Terzis as they discuss using ‘analogue’ literary forms to dissect digital realities.

 

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Island to Island is presented by Asialink Arts and the Emerging Writers’ Festival, supported by Arts Victoria.

Introducing our EWF Adelaide Artists: Jillian Schedneck

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What is your writing/publishing background?

I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was small, but had little idea of how to go about it. I majored in English in university (in the United States, where I’m from), and took some creative writing classes. My professors told me about MFA (Master of Fine Arts) programs in Creative Writing. I ended up going to West Virginia University and focused on Creative Nonfiction writing. I decided on nonfiction instead of fiction—which had been a greater interest during my undergraduate degree—when I picked up a copy of the journal Creative Nonfiction and fell in love with the genre. As part of my MFA, I wrote personal essays, many of which I was able to publish in literary journals.

After I graduated with my MFA, I moved to Abu Dhabi to begin teaching at a university there. I spent a year in Abu Dhabi and a year in Dubai, teaching at another university, and then I returned to the United States to write my travel memoir, Abu Dhabi Days, Dubai Nights. I took a big risk by returning home and writing the book full-time, but I felt I needed to concentrate solely on this project. I was only able to write full-time because of my very generous and supportive family, who let me live with them rent-free while I wrote. I moved to Adelaide in 2010 to begin my PhD, and soon after I was able to sell Abu Dhabi Days, Dubai Nights. The book was published by Pan Macmillan in 2012.

I’m currently writing a novel called Hungry for the World and Its Glow. I now work full-time at the University of Adelaide, and this commitment has made for a very different writingexperience than my last book. However, I have thought about the characters in this book for several years, all through writing my PhD thesis, so now I do feel that when it is time to write—on the weekends and after work—I’m motivated and ready put down on paper what I’ve been planning in my head for so long.

 

Where is your favourite place in Adelaide?

This will probably sound obvious, but my favourite place is the Central Markets. When I first moved to Adelaide I lived on Grote Street right next to the markets, and it was the perfect place to be as a newbie to Adelaide. I love Friday night dinners at the vegan stall in the food court, stocking up at Goodies & Grains, and admiring the beautiful produce at House of Organics.

 

What are you doing for the EWF Adelaide Roadshow?

I’m moderating the Me, Me, Me: Writing about the Self session as part of the Saturday Masterclass, and I’m part of the First – Page Clinic on Sunday afternoon from 1-3. Come by and bring along the first page of whatever you’re working on! We’ll do our best to help you make those opening paragraphs as captivating as possible.

 

Jillian Schedneck’s appearance at EWF Adelaide is proudly supported by The University of Adelaide.

Journals! Journals everywhere! There is no escape.

Unless you’ve had your eyes glued to books for weeks, you’ve probably heard that EWF is heading to Adelaide for the first time ever! Yep, next Friday 5 September we’re kicking things off with ‘The Night of the Living Journals‘, Adelaide’s biggest simultaneous lit journal launch.

Voiceworks, The Lifted Brow, Kill Your Darlings, DubniumOn Dit and local zinesters will all be launching their latest issues with us in Adelaide, so make sure you come along and grab them before everyone else.

ET SEX ISSUE COVER

Things will also get a bit sexy in the evening as Empire Times, Flinders University’s student mag, will be launching their sex issue. It’s their 41st issue of the magazine as it’s been running since 1969! “Sex pet peeves, ‘pizza’ production, lab-grown vaginas, slut shaming, Dom dos and don’ts, the angler fish, sex work and freeing the female nipple are just some bits to get you on your toes for this issue”, says editor Jessica Nicole.

Check out the EWF Adelaide program and we can’t wait to see you there!

Night of the Living Journals
7pm, Friday 5 September
SA Writers’ Centre
Second Floor, 187 Rundle St, Adelaide

EWF Adelaide is proudly supported by Flinders University

 

Introducing our EWF Adelaide Artists: Simon Collinson

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What is your writing/publishing background?

I’ve been a bookseller for five years and a student magazine editor for three. I started freelancing in earnest as an ebook designer and book reviewer after I graduated late last year, and I’m currently Geek-in-Residence at the local trade publisher Wakefield Press, responsible for overhauling their ebook business. I’ve been working for The Lifted Brow since March as their online editor, and I’m also the editorial manager for the boutique ebook publisher Simply Ebooks SA, which we’ll be launching officially in just a few weeks.

Where is your favourite place in Adelaide?

I get withdrawal symptoms if I go more than a couple of weeks without visiting Chinatown and the Central Market. So much good, cheap food in one place (and with free parking nearby, to boot). Plus, I frittered away many many many teenage hours playing Counter-Strike in Chinatown’s seedy internet cafés, so there’s probably a bit of nostalgia there too.

What are you doing for the EWF Adelaide Roadshow?

I’ll be on a panel called ‘Digital Futures’ as part of The Writers’ Masterclass on Saturday 6 September, talking about digital writing in all its forms, with a particular emphasis on some of the stuff I’ve been commissioning for The Lifted Brow—criticism by email, coding ​ and​ writing for Tumblr, ‘Snow Fall’ type parallax pieces, JavaScript ​-enabled​ ​pieces, etc. etc.

I’ll also be at the SA Writers’ Centre on Friday 5 for ‘Night of the Living Journals‘, helping to launch the latest issues of The Lifted Brow, Voiceworks, Kill Your Darlings, and Dubnium, as well as a few other rad little mags. Plus, the Brow’s ​hosting ​’​Mixtape Memoirs​’​ ​​on ​the ​Saturday ​night​ ​​, which is going to be excellent.

 

Over the first weekend of September, the Emerging Writers’ Festival will be knocking on Adelaide’s door for the first time ever, with three days of discussions, performances, workshops, and networking opportunities for emerging writers.

This exciting program begins on Friday with Adelaide’s largest-ever simultaneous literary magazine launch. On Saturday, The Writers’ Masterclass program will allow Adelaide’s writers to upskill, with the day capped off with Mixtape Memoirs, our flagship performance event, featuring a line up of local and interstate writers, musicians, and comic artists. On Sunday, the festival will wrap up with a laid-back series of fun, hands-on events aimed at connecting Adelaide’s emerging writers.

 

 

Introducing our EWF Adelaide Artists: Rory Kennett-Lister

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What is your writing/publishing background?

 I’ve worked as a freelance writer for around 8 years, in that time moving from fawning album reviews of my favourite bands, to slightly more considered non-fiction and fiction pieces. My work has been published in Collect, Overland, The Lifted Brow, and Monocle, among others. I am a former editor of Adelaide University’s On Dit (2011) and currently work as a copywriter in advertising.

Where is your favourite place in Adelaide?

Himeji Garden in the South Parklands, The Exeter Hotel on Rundle Street, and the Adelaide Hills, particularly when viewed from a moving motorcycle

What are you doing for the EWF Adelaide Roadshow?

I will be one part of a writerly melange at the Night of the Living Journals. This will involve a reading of something/s I have written for The Lifted Brow, preceded by numerous, nerve-calming trips to the bar.

 

Over the first weekend of September, the Emerging Writers’ Festival will be knocking on Adelaide’s door for the first time ever, with three days of discussions, performances, workshops, and networking opportunities for emerging writers.

This exciting program begins on Friday with Adelaide’s largest-ever simultaneous literary magazine launch. On Saturday, The Writers’ Masterclass program will allow Adelaide’s writers to upskill, with the day capped off with Mixtape Memoirs, our flagship performance event, featuring a line up of local and interstate writers, musicians, and comic artists. On Sunday, the festival will wrap up with a laid-back series of fun, hands-on events aimed at connecting Adelaide’s emerging writers.

 

Mixtape Memoirs is Coming to Adelaide!

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We’re super excited to be bringing Mixtape Memoirs (one of the most popular Emerging Writers’ Festival events ever invented) to Adelaide with the support of The Lifted Brow!

To whet your appetite for Mixtape Memoirs’ Adelaide debut, our friends at All The Best have recorded three stories from the last Mixtape Memoirs event. Listen in rapture/horror as “nascent love God” Chad Parkhill talks about losing his virginity, Anna Dunnil speaks about “clinging to other people who are hitting rock bottom just as hard as you” and totally nails a badass ukelele cover of The Mountain Goat’s ‘This Year’, and Sam West explains why he find “aggressive cyborg music” truly romantic.

To get you even more excited about Adelaide, have a listen to ‘You Can Have It All’, by Summer Flake. Steph Crase (aka Summer Flake, aka a bit of a musical genius) will be sharing her memoir at Mixtape Memoirs in Adelaide, and following it with some tracks designed to get you swaying soulfully while considering your place in the universe.

Mixtape Memoirs takes place on Saturday 6 September, 7.30pm, at Tuxedo Cat. Find out more and book your earlybird tickets here!

 

Mixtape Memoirs is run in partnership with The Lifted Brow. EWF Adelaide is run in partnership with SA Writers CentreCarclewThe University of AdelaideFifth Quarter, and the Centre for Youth Literature.

Introducing our EWF Adelaide Artists: Amy Maynard

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What is your writing/publishing background?

I’m a PhD student, freelancer, and short story writer. With my research, I study modern Australian comic book publishing. It’s pretty sick, to have a day job where I just study comics. The end game is to write a book about it. Last year I wrote a paper on the cultural capital of Batman graphic novels in the 1980s, and managed to present it at Mansfield College, Oxford. To say that was a wonderfully surreal career highlight is an understatement.

I’ve been a freelance contributor to Pop Matters, WhatCulture, Sequart, Fringe Review, the Australian Comics Journal, Comics Forum, and On the Record. I’m currently the editor of the Writers Bloc Tumblr, Hell Yeah Writers Bloc, where we publish strips and single panel comics, do artist profiles, and event coverage.

My freelance work usually entails me sitting down at my laptop writing about comics and film and and whatever else, trying to keep my profanity to a minimum. (I’m not always successful). The only times I get out the house when I’m freelancing are when I’m reviewing Adelaide Fringe shows. That’s when I turn up to a show three sheets to the wind, scribbling in my little notebook, NEEDS MORE CLOWNS. Even if the show is not about clowns.

Lastly, with my short stories, I’ve only recently started giving it a crack, but I’ve been published in a few places. Hearsay and Dubnium, mainly. I write stories in my spare time. The rest of the time is spent being as nerdy as possible (see above).

Where is your favourite place in Adelaide?

The Grace Emily Hotel. Where can you find a shrine to Bert Newton? The Grace. A tiny Jesus holding a cigarette in a Nativity play? The Grace. A TV showing old cult TV shows at strange hours? The Grace. And then there’s the beer selection! I once had this espresso stout there which was canned nirvana. I don’t remember what the blazes it was called, but it had a sumo wrestler flaunting his butt on it, and it was just perfection.

What are you doing for the EWF Adelaide Roadshow?

I’ll be reading out a story of mine on behalf of the lit magazine Dubnium, and doing some emcee work at comics events.

 

Over the first weekend of September, the Emerging Writers’ Festival will be knocking on Adelaide’s door for the first time ever, with three days of discussions, performances, workshops, and networking opportunities for emerging writers.

This exciting program begins on Friday September 5, with Adelaide’s largest-ever simultaneous literary magazine launch. On Saturday September 6, The Writers’ Masterclass program will allow Adelaide’s writers to upskill, with the day capped off with Mixtape Memoirs, our flagship performance event, featuring a line up of local and interstate writers, musicians, and comic artists. On Sunday September 7, the festival will wrap up with a laid-back series of fun, hands-on events aimed at connecting Adelaide’s emerging writers.

 

 

Introducing our EWF Adelaide Artists: Jane Howard

 

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What is your writing/publishing background?

What is your writing/publishing background? I am a freelance culture critic, writer, and researcher. I started blogging theatre reviews completely as a hobby during the 2009 Fringe, and discovered this untapped passion for analysing performance. At the time I was studying a degree in genetics and working in a research lab, so I certainly never thought writing was where my career would end up. I was lucky to find some early champions of my writing, including local artists and producers, who pushed me in the direction of Lowdown Magazine, which was a youth arts publication – about youth arts or by young writers.

Since then, I’ve been a writer- or blogger-in-resdience on various projects, including two Australian Theatre Forums and an endurance performance art work Mass Action: 137 Cakes In 90 Hours, and I’ve written for publications including RealTime, ABC Arts Online and un Magazine. I’m now a regular contributor to Guardian Australia, and am having some fun doing ‘experimental theatre criticism’ for The Lifted Brow.

Where is your favourite place in Adelaide?

My go-to spot is Coffee Branch on Leigh Street for coffee and what ever lovely baked good they have for sale that day. I always go in just planning to buy a coffee, but it rarely works out that way! It’s good coffee, it’s good for a meeting, and it’s also one of those perfect Adelaide places to always (and I mean always) bump into several friends while you’re there.

What are you doing for the EWF Adelaide Roadshow?

I’ll be chairing a panel on performance writing during the Writers’ Workshop. I don’t know if writers often think about how their work can intersect with performance. Playwrights tend to gravitate towards theatre communities rather than writing communities, which means someone from a creative writing practice might not necessarily meet theatre writers and think about expanding their work out. By the same token, lots of writers who are interested in criticism tend to look towards literature criticism over performance. I hope we can tease out what it is about the genre of performance we love (both writing for and writing about) and inspire some people to think about their writing in a way they perhaps haven’t before.

 

Over the first weekend of September, the Emerging Writers’ Festival will be knocking on Adelaide’s door for the first time ever, with three days of discussions, performances, workshops, and networking opportunities for emerging writers.

This exciting program begins on Friday with Adelaide’s largest-ever simultaneous literary magazine launch. On Saturday, The Writers’ Masterclass program will allow Adelaide’s writers to upskill, with the day capped off with Mixtape Memoirs, our flagship performance event, featuring a line up of local and interstate writers, musicians, and comic artists. On Sunday, the festival will wrap up with a laid-back series of fun, hands-on events aimed at connecting Adelaide’s emerging writers.

 

 

 

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